Breeds

Boston terrier



The Boston Terrier is a breed of dog originating in the United States. This "American Gentleman" was accepted in 1893 by the American Kennel Club as a non-sporting breed. Color and markings are important when distinguishing this breed to the AKC standard. They should be either black, brindle or seal with white markings. Bostons are small and compact with a short tail and erect ears. The AKC says they are highly intelligent and very easily trained. They are friendly and can be stubborn at times. The average life span of a Boston is around 11 to 15 years, though some can live well into their teens.

The American Kennel Club ranked the Boston Terrier as the 23rd most popular pure-breed in the United States in 2012 and 2013.

The Boston Terrier is a gentle breed that typically has a strong, happy-go-lucky, and friendly personality. Bostons are generally eager to please their owner and can be easily trained. They can be very protective of their owners, which may result in aggressive and territorial behavior toward other pets and strangers. The breed requires only a minimum amount of grooming.

While originally bred for fighting as well as hunting rats in garment factories, they were later down bred for companionship. They are not considered terriers by the American Kennel Club, however, but are part of the non-sporting group.

Both females and males are generally quiet and bark only when necessary,[9] though early training in this regard is essential.[10][11] Their usually sensible attitude towards barking makes them excellent choices for apartment dwellers. They enjoy being around people, get along well with children, the elderly, other canines, and non-canine pets, if properly socialized.

Bulldog



The Bulldog is a medium-sized breed of dog commonly referred to as the English Bulldog or British Bulldog. Other Bulldog breeds include the American Bulldog, Old English Bulldog (now extinct), Olde English Bulldogge, and the French Bulldog. The Bulldog is a muscular, heavy dog with a wrinkled face and a distinctive pushed-in nose. The American Kennel Club (AKC), The Kennel Club (UK), and the United Kennel Club (UKC) oversee breeding standards. Bulldogs are the 5th most popular purebreed in the United States in 2013 according to the American Kennel Club.

The Bulldog is a breed with characteristically wide head and shoulders along with a pronounced mandibular prognathism. There are generally thick folds of skin on a Bulldog's brow; round, black, wide-set eyes; a short muzzle with characteristic folds called a knot above the nose; hanging skin under the neck; drooping lips and pointed teeth, and occasionally an underbite. The coat is short, flat, and sleek, with colours of red, fawn, white, brindle, and piebald.

Bulldogs are one of the few breeds whose tail is naturally short and either straight or screwed and thus is not cut or docked as with some other breeds. A straight tail is a more desirable tail according the breed standard set forth by the BCA if it is facing downward, not upwards.

According to the American Kennel Club (AKC), a Bulldog's disposition should be "equable and kind, resolute, and courageous (not vicious or aggressive), and demeanor should be pacific and dignified. These attributes should be countenanced by the expression and behavior"

French Bulldog



The French Bulldog is a small breed of domestic dog. "Frenchies" were the result in the 1800s of a cross between bulldog ancestors imported from England and local ratters in Paris, France.[3][4]

In the UK, they moved up to become the fourth most popular registered dog by 2014. In the USA, French bulldogs moved up to be the ninth most popular AKC registered dog breed by 2014. The modern French Bulldog breed descends directly from the dogs of the Molossians, an ancient Greek tribe. The dogs were spread throughout the ancient world by Phoenician traders. British Molossian dogs were developed into the Mastiff. A sub-family of the Mastiff were the Bullenbeisser, a type of dog used for bull-baiting.

Blood sports such as bull-baiting were outlawed in England in 1835, leaving these "bulldogs" unemployed. However, they had been bred for non-sporting reasons since at least 1800, and so their use changed from a sporting breed to a companion breed. To reduce their size, some bulldogs were crossed with terriers, while others were crossed with pugs. By 1850 the Toy Bulldog had become common in England, and appeared in conformation shows when they began around 1860.[citation needed] These dogs weighed around 16–25 pounds (7.3–11.3 kg), although classes were also available at dog shows for those that weighed under 12 pounds (5.4 kg).

At the same time, lace workers from Nottingham, displaced by the industrial revolution, began to settle in Normandy, France. They brought a variety of dogs with them, including miniature Bulldogs.[10] The dogs became popular in France and a trade in imported small Bulldogs was created, with breeders in England sending over Bulldogs that they considered to be too small, or with faults such as ears that stood up. By 1860, there were few miniature Bulldogs left in England, such was their popularity in France and due to the exploits of specialist dog exporters.

The small bulldog type gradually became thought of as a breed, and received a name, the Bouledogue Francais. This Francization of the English name is also a contraction of the words "boule" (ball) and "dogue" (mastiff or molosser). The dogs were highly fashionable and were sought after by society ladies and Parisian prostitutes alike, as well as creatives such as artists, writers and fashion designers. However, records were not kept of the breed's development as it diverged further away from its original bulldog roots. As it changed, terrier and pug stock may have been brought in to develop traits such as the breed's long straight ears, and the roundness of their eyes.

Pug



The Pug is a breed of dog with a wrinkly, short-muzzled face and curled tail. The breed has a fine, glossy coat that comes in a variety of colours, most often fawn or black, and a compact square body with well-developed muscles.

Pugs were brought from China to Europe in the sixteenth century and were popularized in Western Europe by the House of Orange of the Netherlands, and the House of Stuart. In the United Kingdom in the nineteenth century Queen Victoria developed a passion for Pugs which she passed on to other members of the Royal family.

Pugs are known for being sociable and gentle companion dogs. The breed remains popular into the twenty-first century, with some famous celebrity owners. A Pug was judged Best in Show at the World Dog Show in 2004.

While the Pugs that are depicted in eighteenth century prints tend to be long and lean,[2] modern breed preferences are for a square cobby body, a compact form, a deep chest, and well-developed muscle.Their smooth and glossy coats can be fawn, apricot fawn, silver fawn or black. The markings are clearly defined and there is a trace of a black line extending from the occiput to the tail.[4] The tail normally curls tightly over the hip.[2]

Pugs have two distinct shapes for their ears, "rose" and "button". "Rose" ears are smaller than the standard style of "button" ears, and are folded with the front edge against the side of the head. Breeding preference goes to "button" style ears.

Pugs' legs are very strong, straight, of moderate length, and are set well under. Their shoulders are moderately laid back. Their ankles are strong, their feet are small, their toes are well split-up, and their nails are black. The lower teeth normally protrude further than their upper, resulting in an under-bite.

The breed is often described as multum in parvo, or "much in little", alluding to the Pug's remarkable personality, despite its small size. Pugs are strong willed but rarely aggressive, and are suitable for families with children. The majority of the breed is very fond of children and sturdy enough to properly play with them. Depending on their owner's mood, they can be quiet and docile but also vivacious and teasing.[7] Pugs tend to be intuitive and sensitive to the moods of their owners and are usually eager to please them. Pugs tend to have a somewhat lazy nature and spend a lot of time napping. They are often called "shadows" because they follow their owners around and like to stay close to the action, craving attention and affection from their owners.

Miniature Schnauzer



The Miniature Schnauzer is a breed of small dog of the Schnauzer type that originated in Germany in the mid-to-late 19th century. Miniature Schnauzers developed from crosses between the Standard Schnauzer and one or more smaller breeds such as the Poodle and Affenpinscher, as farmers bred a small dog that was an efficient ratting dog. They are described as "spunky"[1] but aloof dogs, with good guarding tendencies without some guard dogs' predisposition to bite. Miniature Schnauzers are recognized in three colors internationally: solid black, black and silver, and a color known as 'salt and pepper'. There is a controversial fourth color variant in Miniature Schnauzers, pure white, which is not recognized universally.

The breed remains one of the most popular worldwide, primarily for its temperament and relatively small size. As of 2013 it is the 17th most popular breed in the U.S.

The American Kennel Club breed standard describes temperament as "alert and spirited, yet obedient to command... friendly, intelligent and willing to please... never overaggressive or timid."[5] Usually easy to train, they tend to be excellent watchdogs with a good territorial instinct, but more inclined toward barking than biting. They are often aloof with strangers until the owners of the home welcome the guest, upon which they are typically very friendly to them.[16]

They are highly playful dogs, and, if not given the outlet required for their energy, they can become bored and invent their own "fun". Miniature Schnauzers can compete in dog agility trials, obedience, showmanship, flyball, and tracking. Schnauzers have a high prey drive, which means they may attack other small pets such as birds, snakes, and rodents. Many will also attack cats, but this may be curbed with training, or if the dog is raised with cats.

German Spitz



German Spitz is used to refer to both a breed of dog and category or type of dog. Several modern breeds have been developed from the German Spitz, and are either registered as separate breeds or as varieties of German Spitz. All the German Spitz type dogs are dogs of the Spitz type of German origin. The Großspitz, Mittelspitz, and Kleinspitz breeds of German Spitz type are also called the German Spitz in English.

German Spitz are similar in appearance but vary in colour. The German Spitz is usually Black, Gold/Cream and black or White-ish, but the Standard, Small and Dwarf can have various colour combinations as well. All German Spitzen have a wolf/fox-like head, double coat, highset triangular ears and a tail that is curled over the back. Although the Kleinspitz and the Pomeranian look alike, they are not the same dog. Also, although the American Eskimo Dog and Japanese Spitz look almost alike, they are in fact two different breeds with different lineages and breed histories.

Bichon Frise



A Bichon Frisé is a small breed of dog of the Bichon type. The Bichon Frise is a member of the Non-Sporting Group of dog breeds in the US,[1] and a member of the Toy Dog group in the UK.

The Bichon Frise is a small dog that weighs approximately 5–10 kg (10–20 lbs) and stands 23–30 cm (9–12 in) at the withers, but slightly larger dogs are not uncommon. The skull is slightly rounded and the muzzle is not pointy. The tail is groomed to be long and curly and is carried over the back. It has a black nose and dark round eyes; its white hair consists of a curly, dense coat with little shedding (much like a poodle in this respect), although many of the breed do tend to have less curly hair than others. A small amount of buff, cream, or apricot color may be seen around its ears, snout, paws or body, but normally these colors do not exceed 10% of its body. FCI/AKC Standard coat color is pure white, other colors like apricot or grey, are not recognized. A white coat is preferred in the show ring. The head and legs are proportionate in size to the body, and the ears and tail are natural (not docked or cropped).[11] The coat is trimmed often to make the hair seem like an even length. Bichon Frises can have a medium-high intelligence

The American Kennel Club (AKC) refers to the Bichon Frise as "merry" and "cheerful", and the breed standard calls for a dog that is "gentle mannered, sensitive, playful and affectionate". The Bichon Frise loves human company and demands much of your attention. They are generally very sociable and do well with an owner that takes them along on outings. They are charming, affectionate, and intelligent. Bichons do well with children because they are playful and have lots of energy. If affiliated with a particular territory and encouraged by owners, they can become very territorial.[13] Bred to be companion dogs, the Bichon Frise tends to get along well with both children and other animals.

Bichon Frises are very obedient if training is started early and continued constantly
FRENCH BULDOG
PUG
BOSTON TERRIER
MINIATURE SCHNAUZER
BULLDOG
GERMAN SPITZ
About us
Our kennel is located in Bršadin near Vukovar, where we are surrounded by the endless fields of Slavonia, enjoying in nature and fresh air.
Breeds
We have registered our kennel and decided to breed these wonderful dog types:
- Boston terrier
- Bulldog
- French Bulldog
- Pug
- Miniature Schnauzer
- German Spitz
- Bichon Frise
- Boo
Contact
Owner: Ciric Ninoslav
tel. +385 91 2020 799
email. vukovar2222@hotmail.com
About us
Our kennel is located in Bršadin near Vukovar, where we are surrounded by the endless fields of Slavonia, enjoying in nature and fresh air.
Breeds
We have registered our kennel and decided to breed these wonderful dog types:
- Boston terrier
- Bulldog
- French Bulldog
- Pug
- Miniature Schnauzer
- German Spitz
- Bichon Frise
- Boo
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